I did it my way

A change of heart after a quarrel

Photo by Damir Khabirov - stock.adobe.com

1 min read
By
J. Z.

Some time ago, my husband was trying to fix a cufflink. The stone had detached. He asked me what kind of glue he would need and I went to get the one I thought would do the job. He applied it to the metal to glue the stone back on.

From my experience, it was obvious that he had not used nearly enough so I took the cufflink and put more glue on it. My husband remarked that I had not asked if I could help, but that I had just grabbed the cufflink away from him to do it my way. He was right.

I felt bad and apologized, but I went to bed a little miffed that he had not appreciated me for fixing his cufflink properly. I was more than miffed: I was in a bad mood, and went to sleep in a bad mood.

Perhaps that’s the reason why that night I even had a dream in which my husband was very mean to me. I have never had a dream like that about him.

I woke up the next morning feeling miserable after these events. My husband tried to start a conversation, but I told him I was not in the mood and didn’t want to talk. He said nothing.

I was on my way to the kitchen in a grumpy mood when a Gospel phrase flashed into my mind: “Set your minds on things that are above, not on things that are on earth” (Col 3:2).

“Things that are above.” Those words hit me like a bolt of lightning. I realized that I was not living the Gospel way and that I had to change my attitude and my heart.

That thought made me turn around and go back to see my husband. I told him I was ready to talk now. I told him about the dream and how it had left me with sour feelings, and I apologized sincerely for my rather rude behavior.

I felt free. I had overcome my shortcoming and the love between us was re-established.

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